Save Internet Radio

 

In 2002 there was an appeal to radio listeners.

Contact your Representative and Senators to save Internet Radio!

To send a fax, please fill in the simple blanks at the bottom of this letter. Three letters will be generated for you with the wording below. The letters will be faxed to your House Representative and two Senators.

 

Valued Listener:

Thank you for taking a moment to preserve your access to the kind of Internet radio that you are listening to right now.

Recently the Copyright Arbitration Royalty Panel (CARP) that was appointed by the U.S. Government Copyright Office, at the prompting of the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), recommended new and burdensome royalty payments on Internet radio broadcasters. These royalties do not apply to traditional broadcasters of AM and FM radio, so they represent a direct attempt by the RIAA to drive Internet radio out of business. For some reason, they believe that Internet radio is a threat to CD sales, even though they also believe that broadcast radio represents free advertising.

You can read more about this ruling, issued by the Copyright Arbitration Royalty Panel (CARP) at www.saveinternetradio.org.

These royalty costs far exceed our actual income let alone any profit. They are also retroactive to 1998. This means that most stations are facing massive "past due" bills for everything they have ever played to listeners like you in the last four years. In simple terms, this misguided ruling by the panel will bankrupt most Internet radio stations. At best, a few deep-pocket corporations will continue to serve music over the Internet. Since these few corporations will dominate the market, the variety you have come to love will disappear in favor of high-profit "Top 40" formats.

There is still hope. On May 21st, the Librarian of Congress rejected the CARP panel's ruling. Now, the future of Internet Radio hangs in the balance as we await a revised ruling from the Librarian himself. By law, the Librarian must issue this ruling by June 20th, so time is short. You can influence this process by sending a fax to your congressman and your senators (because the Librarian of Congress reports to them - they are his "boss"), but you must do so today. To help you, we have set up a free fax service that will do this for you. All you have to do is supply us with your name and address so that we can automatically determine who represents you and send them a fax. You will have a chance to view the fax to make sure that you agree with what it says. We will need to retain your personal information in order to prove that the faxes sent to congress are from real people. However, we will not distribute your personal information for any commercial purpose. It will be used solely as a part of our effort with the US Congress to ensure a fair royalty rate for Internet Radio.

Please help us stay in business, so that we can continue to serve you!

Sincerely,
[Your Internet Broadcaster]

Only the first stage is complete!

Make sure Internet Radio lives! You have until June 20th to make sure the Librarian of Congress knows how you feel. 

Click Here

Click on the banner above to read more and to send a fax to your congressional representative to help save Internet radio broadcasters.

Encourage your legislators to urge the Librarian of Congress to make a royalty rate decision that will be financially fair for webcasters and keep them in business.

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Contact your Representative and Senators to save Internet Radio!

To send a fax, please fill in the simple blanks at the bottom of this letter. Three letters will be generated for you with the wording below. The letters will be faxed to your House Representative and two Senators.

 

Sample letter:

 

Your Name
Street Address
City, State

Representative/Senator [name]
US Congress
Washington DC

Dear Representative/Senator [name filled in]:

I am writing today to strongly request that you act to save student programs at colleges, universiti es and secondary schools across the country. Important educational, student, and community programs are being terminated in response to the recent CARP royalty rate set by the Librarian of Congress as mandated by the Digital Millennium Copyright Act ("DMCA").

The demise of webcasting by colleges, universities, and secondary schools will cheat coming generati ons of students out of vital experiences with new technologies and deprive on-line audiences of uniq ue cultural and educational programming.

These noncommercial educational stations were precluded from taking part in the CARP process due to the extraordinary cost of participation. Additionally, the CARP process itself is flawed. Please rev iew the recent hearing testimony at (http://www.house.gov/judiciary/courts.htm) if you need clarific ation.

Following the flawed CARP process, this panel and the Librarian were forced to base their decisions on one marketplace agreement, with the very large corporation Yahoo, Inc. This deal was so expensive that Yahoo has not even renewed it! Even more astounding is the revelation that this deal was purposefully designed to limit competition by forcing rival small webcasters to cease operations (see com ments of Mark Cuban at http://www.kurthanson.com/archive/news/062402/index.asp).

I therefore ask that you write, sponsor or vote for legislation that would:

1.Set a flat rate of $200 per year for these stations.
2.Set reasonable recordkeeping requirements, such as those previously enacted under Section 118 of t he Copyright Act. 
3.Remove content restrictions imposed by the DMCA, when the programming can be determined to be of s ocial or educational value.

Congress must act immediately to guarantee the future of noncommercial educational services produced by this and future generations of students.

Sincerely, 
Your Name 

 

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Valued Listener:

Thank you for taking a moment to preserve your access to the kind of Internet radio that you are listening to right now.

Recently the Copyright Arbitration Royalty Panel (CARP) that was appointed by the U.S. Government Copyright Office, at the prompting of the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), recommended new and burdensome royalty payments on all Internet radio broadcasters. You can read more about this ruling, issued by the Copyright Arbitration Royalty Panel (CARP) at www.saveinternetradio.org.

These royalty costs will preclude non-commercial student radio from continuing on the web. They are also retroactive to 1998. This means that most stations are facing massive "past due" bills for everything they have ever played to listeners like you in the last four years.

We need you to fax your congressional representatives and tell them to change this ruling!

To help you, we have set up a free fax service that will do this for you. All you have to do is supply us with your name and address so that we can automatically determine who represents you and send them a fax. You will have a chance to view the fax to make sure that you agree with what it says. We will need to retain your personal information in order to prove that the faxes sent to congress are from real people. However, we will not distribute your personal information for any commercial purpose. It will be used solely as a part of our effort with the US Congress to ensure the survival of student radio on the web.

Please help us preserve student radio on the Internet!

Sincerely,
[Your Internet Broadcaster]

 

A more generalized sample letter from a listener:

 

Dear Senator Schumer

My permanent residence is in Manhattan.  I'm a loyal listener of several internet radio stations and I'm especially fond of the service provided by WNYC, which permits me to listen to their broadcasts from anywhere in the world.  I spend a good deal of time in Switzerland and Australia but because of internet streaming, I am able to stay informed on local issues without missing a beat.  I've also learned how to spatchcock a chicken, something that I've always wanted to learn, as well as prepare a meal coordinated with wine, vegetables and desert.

After being a victim of a moth infestation that destroyed a family heirloom, I've also received valuable information about how and why you should vacuum your carpet's fibers to prevent moth infestations. The rug cleaning company I hired was also discovered via the internet streaming service offered by WNYC.

The school my daughter currently attends is another fantastic find - again I credit radio programming for informing me of my choices and helping me make the final decisions that have clearly improved our lives.

Please do everything in your power to preserve the availability of citizens to access the huge variety of internet radio streams we so dearly love and depend upon to keep us informed and knowledgeable. It would be a shame to lose this valuable service.

Thank you for your time

Janet Cobb

BroadcastPromotions.net